Wrapping Things Up

First, I’d like to thank everyone who submitted internship applications with us.  We had more submissions than I ever anticipated.  It’s been very difficult making final decisions, and we had far more qualified applicants than we had positions available.

We’ve concluded our review process and have contacted applicants to offer them internships.  At this point I am compiling a wait list of additional qualified applicants in the event that a position becomes available.  I will begin contacting all of you personally in the upcoming days.

As I mentioned, this was much harder than I anticipated.  I appreciate your enthusiasm for the project and your patience with the decision making.  Please keep checking back for news as the project unfolds.  As additional opportunities arise I will post them here.

Good luck and many thanks,

Miche

So what happens now, you ask?

So… it’s mid-January now.  I haven’t finished all the interviews yet, but we’re getting close.  I have to say I’ve been both overwhelmed and completely impressed with the caliber (and number) of our candidates!

It was no surprise to hear that there are people out there who want to work with whales.  Humpbacks have an almost irrational ability to inspire awe in the public, and in the minds of young biologists in particular.  What was so exciting about your applications was how diverse and creative they were. Our applicants come from Illinois, Oregon, Rhode Island, Florida, California, Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Vermont, Peru, Spain, Britain, Germany, Singapore, Australia, and Canada.  They are students, graduates, and professionals. Freshman, sophomore, junior, seniors, master’s students, PhD students, and working ecologists.

I mentioned in some of our interviews, and likely on this website as well, that part of why this project is important to me is because of its potential to not only mitigate, but potentially prevent, negative interactions between humans and whales.  I also mentioned, however, that this project is important to me because it is creates opportunities to bring enthusiastic individuals into the field where they can become scientists who work together toward a common goal- which is cumulatively bigger than ourselves.

So… what does happen next?

Logistically it is time to begin making choices.  Hopefully within the next week we will begin contacting applicants and offering them positions with us this summer.  As always it’s a bit of a tango between skill and schedules.  It may take a week or two before our team sifts out, other opportunities may have emerged for you over the course of this application process.  If that’s the case, no worries.  But if I offer you a spot and you think you can’t take it?  Give me a heads up!  There’s someone else- a talented, willing, someone else- who wants to fill that spot.

If you have any last-minute questions let me know!  Now’s the time to get anything off your chest you may be worried about, thrilled about, or confused about.  As always, feel free to contact me at absolutely any time.

Many thanks to all of you!

Miche

TheRapunzelProject@gmail.com

Questions… Answers

First let me say thank you to all of the intern candidates who’ve already sent in applications.  It’s been exciting to start reading over them.  For those of you who’ve expressed interest in applying but haven’t completed everything yet you do still have some time, but thanks for keeping in touch.

I’ve gotten a few questions from applicants that I thought other might benefit from as well.  I’ll update this list as more questions come in.

  • Q: “I’m a vegetarian, will that work with the 3 meals a day provided?”
  • A: Absolutely.  We eat very well at the lighthouse and can accommodate most diets (I mentioned before, but I don’t think we could accommodate a raw food diet… we’re simply too remote for that).  Vegetarianism, however, is a piece of cake.  Last year we handled vegan diets, vegetarian diets, and peanut allergies without breaking a sweat. I’ve been a vegetarian for 5 years myself and last year I did most of the cooking at the lighthouse (with no complaints from non-vegetarians I might add).  We do try to supplement store bought food with sustainably caught seafood from around the lighthouse (caught by the interns) whenever possible.  Last year one of our interns caught a halibut large enough to feed the crew for weeks.  We bring LOTS of vegetables with us from Petersburg when we come out, and are still working through possible delivery systems with boats in the area.
  • Q: “Will there be any photo identification?”
  • A: No.  Our project is not contingent of identifying individual whales.  Part of the beauty of using the lighthouse as a research platform is that we get to observe the whales relatively unaffected by human presence (i.e. a large vessels).  We are looking for contrasts in behavior in the presence and absence of vessels. A photo identification scheme that necessitates approaching whales on the water nullifies this goal.
  • Q: “How often will we be on the water?”
  • A: Daily, weather permitting.  We hope to have a hydrophone in the water as much as possible (12 hours a day ideally).  This requires an intern to be in the skiff operating it.  All interns will have the opportunity (and the responsibility) to handle the skiff.
  • Q: “Do whales ever approach the skiff?”
  • A: I don’t know what the whales will do in the future, but in the past?  Yes.  As did 700 lb sea lions, harbor seals, and Dall’s porpoise.
  • Q: “Are there other marine mammals in the area other than humpback whales?”
  • A: Yes!  See above for a short list.  Additionally we did see killer whales last year.  There is a harbor seal that regularly hauls out at the south end of the island to visit with.
  • Q: “Are there kayaks on the island?”
  • A: Yes there are.  We have 2 kayaks on the island currently, and there is the possibility of getting a third, and possibly a 4th for the summer.
  • Q: “What’s the easiest way to get to Petersburg, AK from  ___(fill in the blank)____?”
  • A: Alaska airlines services Petersburg, AK multiple times daily.  Most flights are routed through either Seattle, WA or Anchorage, AK.  Check their website (www.alaskaair.com) for more specific information on flights.
  • Q: “Is it possible to stay for 3 weeks instead of 4?” Or “is it possible to come at the beginning of the month instead of the middle?”
  • A: Unfortunately, no.  There is no public transportation to or from the lighthouse, and it is approximately 30 miles away from the nearest town.  We will be chartering a boat to bring interns to the light from Petersburg, AK, but unless it’s an emergency we will not be traveling back and forth to town otherwise.  Thus ducking out early, or coming late can’t realistically be accommodated.
  • Q: “What are the exact dates of the internship?”
  • A: I don’t know yet.  We’re still working out the details with the Juneau Lighthouse Association.  I’ll post dates (and likely email them out as well) as soon as I have them!

 

Hope this is helpful.  Feel free to send me other questions as they arise.

Miche